Fine Art Photography: Imaging for output, Three Part Discussion

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The end result of photography is not as it used to be. In the days of film photography the only way the photographer could view the image was as an actual printed photograph or sit in a darkened room and

original on screen irisview a slide show. If the processed photo was excellent the photographer might consider an enlargement for display. Unless the photographer had access to a dark room the film and print were created by “photo labs”. The photographer usually did not have much input into how the image was processed and developed. The only way others could view or enjoy the work of the photographer was to actually be there and view the physical print or the slide show. Occasionally, professional photographers were published in magazines and were able to share their work with a larger audience. Most photos, however, were developed, printed to a small format and then stuck in a drawer and forgotten.

Digital imaging and the internet have changed everything. Photographers can now share their work with the entire world. Through social media sites like Flickr, Smugmug, Facebook or email photographers can display their work and get feedback. With tools like Photoshop, Lightroom or Picasa the photographic artist can enhance, create and process his work in the “digital darkroom”. With the cost of film development eliminated, an artist can be as prolific as she wants to be. One need never create an actual print to consider oneself a digital photographic artist. As one develops as a photographic artist in this digital age, the mastery of imaging software is the first step in becoming a fine art photographer.

 There comes a time, however, when the photographer wants to have an actual print. Whether it is to enter competitions and art shows or to hang on the wall, the printing of one’s digital work is a logical next step. Often there is a surprise and disappointment when the resulting print does not come close to matching the image on the computer screen. The photographer then realizes that there is another element to learn in this process. There are many factors that effect digital imaging output. From defining and working in a color space to specifying profiles for the print media, the variables in printing can be daunting and mysterious.

In this three part discussion, we will start with image capture, processing and color space. Part two will discuss media profiles, screen calibration and print drivers and software, part three will cover the printing process, printers and media.

Art Festivals

  Arts and crafts festivals are one way to market your art or fine art craft. For some artists this is a way of life. For others it is a good way to supplement their art income by doing a few shows each year. It can be a grueling and exhausting, yet for some artists it is very profitable.  If you think your work would sell well in the festival setting, try out a few local venues.  An online site, Art Fairs Calendar.com, has an extensive listing of art festivals. http://www.artfaircalendar.com/art_fair/new-england-art-fairs.html   Many of the on-line listing sites charge membership fees for information on festivals and calls for entry. Subscribing to one or more may be worth the fees in the time saved by searching.  However, if you wish to enter or attend a specific show or two, paid subscriptions are likely not worth the expense. Most venues have on-line information and applications forms.    

 Now is the time to start your applications, if you wish to participate in the 2011 season. Most summer shows have March or even earlier deadlines.  If you have not participated in a festival be prepared.  Start with small local venues, unjuried if you are new to the process. Go to the shows you would like  to enter and get a feel for the set-up and ask the participants how they are doing.  Find shows where your art fits in.

Winner

Congratulations to Anne Smyth

for winning the Giclee of New England “Sign of Spring”  photo Competition.  Her Photo of Hadley Massacusetts is a great example of Spring in New England, with the flowering shurbs in the foreground backed by the bare hills.

Spring in New England, by Anne Smyth

New GoNE, Inc. Competion!

Sights of Spring: New GoNE, Inc Fan Page Competion

Upload your best spring shot taken between 4-1-10 to 4-15-10 to our fan page on Facebook . We will chose our favorite and the winner will recieve a free print of the image up to 16×20 on Kodak Luster photo paper.  Limit is one up load per day from now until 4-16-10 (max 8 from each photographer-one per day).  If you are a painter, upload a spring painting.

If you really blow me away, you could be in contention for an upcoming gallery show.